EPC Explained
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Energy Performance Certificate (EPC ) is broadly similar to the certificates found on many domestic appliances. A Certificate for a building gives the building an asset rating based on its energy efficiency, but doesn't take into account how the home is used by the occupiers.

Energy Performance Certificates (EPC's)

These certificates are for all buildings and will be required whenever a building is constructed, rented or sold.

 

 

The Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) is broadly similar to the labels now provided with domestic appliances such as refrigerators and washing machines.

Its purpose is to record how energy efficient a property is as a building. The certificate will provide a rating of the energy efficiency and carbon emissions of a building from A to G, where A is very efficient and G is very inefficient.

EPCs are produced using standard methods with standard assumptions about energy usage so that the energy efficiency of one building can easily be compared with another building of the same type. This allows prospective buyers, tenants, owners, occupiers and purchasers to see information on the energy efficiency and carbon emissions from their building so they can consider energy efficiency and fuel costs as part of their investment.

An EPC is always accompanied by a recommendation report that lists cost effective and other measures (such as low and zero carbon generating systems) to improve the energy rating of the building. The certificate is also accompanied by information about the rating that could be achieved if all the recommendations were implemented. The certificate will include information on the property's energy efficiency rating, along with carbon emissions produced by the building and an estimate of annual running costs. This will help potential tenants, owners and occupiers to be able to consider energy efficiency in their investment.

In England and Wales the EPC will also include the Environmental Impact Rating in addition to the A-G energy performance chart. In addition to the ratings the certificate also offers advice on how to save energy around the home.

When are assessments required?
An Energy Performance Certificate is only required when a building is constructed, sold or rented out, however, if homeowners not selling their home wish to find out how energy efficient their home is, they may also commission an EPC. An EPC is valid for 10 years, except for sales of homes which are subject to the Home Information Pack Regulations 2007, where a Home Information Pack (HIP) is required. In these cases an EPC must be no more than 12 months old when the property is first marketed.The phasing of the measures is provided in the information below:

For Domestic Dwellings the timescales for implementation is as follows:

6th April 2008 - EPC required on Construction for all dwellings

1st October 2008 - EPC required on the Sale or Rent of ALL remaining Dwellings, this includes those sold by Private Treaty, Local Authority Housing, Seasonal & Holiday accommodation, Portfolio of properties, Right to Buy and similar.

For Non-Domestic Dwellings the timescales for implementation is as follows:

6th April 2008 - EPC required for the Construction, Sale or Rent for buildings over 10,000 m2

1st July 2008 - EPC required for the Construction, Sale or Rent for buildings over 2,500 m2

1st October 2008 - EPC required for the Construction, Sale or Rent for all remaining buildings over 50 m2

1st October 2008 - Display Energy Certificate (DEC) required for all Public Buildings over 1,000 m2

For more information about financial support to improve your home:
There will also be recommendations for cost-effective actions to improve the building's rating. The potential rating is based on all the recommendations being implemented.

Home Information Pack

Source: www.homeinformationpacks.gov.uk
Contact us 07803 909109 or book online.